Tambrands- Overcoming Cultural Resistance

The successful marketing of products and services is rooted in the perfect understanding of the culture of a given market. Thus successful marketing approaches must be considerate of the local cultures to deliver the message to the people in the right manner (Kennedy, 2000). Tambrands advertisements need not to generalize different markets since varying cultures present unique challenges to marketers.  This paper examines the Tambrands journey towards overcoming cultural barriers in marketing tampons.


 

Tambrands has effectively utilized wisdom to gain a global footing towards sustaining its business.  Most notably Tambrands realization that the changing global markets in America could no longer sustain the business is a rational decision that allowed Tambrands to think outside the box.  It, therefore, emerges that the realization that Tambrands can have a sustainable business is anchored on the realization and the acceptance of its weaknesses and the truths of Proctor and gamble.  Firstly, proctor and gamble have a global presence and a highly established distribution network.  This largely overcomes the weakness that Tambrands distribution network is inexistent in the new regions the company is interested in.  The next rationality is that Tambrands approach to marketing its product cannot match that of Proctor and gamble.  It’s thus evident that the approach adopted by proctor and gamble in marketing the tampons is highly effective in crossing cultural barriers and has led to increased sales

The goal to market tampons by Tambrands in the same way in each cluster is largely misinformed.  The idea to generalize these regions as homogenous markets fail to understand the cultural inclinations of different countries and how such cultures can influence the uptake of a given technology or a product. Indeed, this was exemplified by the Brazilian market where the youth believe that tampons are a  threat to virginity, more so, religious inclinations had effects on how given people perceive the tampons (De Mooij, 2010). Thus clustering regions based on resistance to tampons fails to account for different cultures which influence consumer choices.  When Tambrands considers marketing to a cluster in a similar way,  it fails to account for the level of education of a given population, religious views,  traditions, lifestyles and other factors that are definitive of their culture. Thus a clustered approach where a similar approach is generalized in different population is deemed to fail.  Tambrands original idea adapted to the joint advertising campaign should be sustained.


The goal to support an education program as a campaign tool is a prerequisite to perfect market information, bridging cultural and religious misconception as well as fostering positive relations with the target market.  Such an approach can have a significant effect on African children and the general state of health education among African women.

To make Tambrands marketing campaign successful in the three clusters, several approaches must be adopted. These measures, therefore, relate to culture and consequently set each cluster different. Firstly, the cluster number one which includes Australia, United States and united kingdom already sue tampons. However, cultural resistance exists in religion and a lack of perfect product information. Therefore, in this region,  the marketing campaign should focus on increasing awareness of the product and overcoming religious barriers. The second cluster includes South Africa, France and Israel. In this region, Tambrands needs to cultural resistance from scientific misconceptions. Since most people in these regions believe that tampons are unnatural and block flow, the marketing approach can prove scientifically that tampons do not obstruct flow to wade off fear.  Secondly, the marketing campaign can scientifically prove that tampons do not pose a threat to virginity to increase awareness and eliminate fear. Under the third cluster which includes Russia, Brazil and China, Tambrands need to overcome misconceptions of losing virginity and uneasiness.  The marketing campaign can be optimised to have people test free products to eliminate the perceptions of uneasiness while also using professionals to carry health education to demystify the impacts of tampons on virginity.

Undertaking campaigns to increase consumer awareness can be used as a  marketing approach for the three clusters.  Most notably,  in all regions there lacks perfect market information of tampons. Still, it is worth considering that for the market to be sustainable, it has to have new entrants since ageing women are exiting the market. Therefore, marketing to create more awareness of tampons should be applied in all three clusters.

P&G should not reopen the Brazilian market with the Mexican model.  Firstly, there are cultural barriers to dress code and language. By the company adopting the model used in Mexico,  it may create advertisement slogans that might offend the Brazilians and therefore fail to convey the message. This is similar to the Venezuelan case where some words are considered offensive and reference to mother as offensive too. Secondly, the Mexican model should not be used in Brazil since the dress code between the two regions is different.  This is evident from the clash of culture where Venezuelans dress lifestyle is different from the Mexican due to climatically differences (De Mooij, 2010). Thus generalising the approach used in Mexico may offend Brazilians or fail to convey the intended message.


 

The critical approach undertaken by the person commenting on the protecting futures program is cynical. Indeed, this program has the direct influence of improving education, better health, clean water and a longer life. The protecting futures program entails puberty education and a wide array of education support services which ensure that African girls do not miss school and have access to the hygienic environment. Indeed, with better education, the future of the girls is secured, and with better hygiene, their health standards are improved guaranteeing longer lives.

 

References

De Mooij, M. (2010). Consumer behavior and culture: Consequences for global marketing and advertising. Sage.

Kennedy, D. A. (2000). Marketing goods, marketing images: The impact of advertising on race. Ariz. St. LJ32, 615.

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